How to Network Without Sounding Like a Jerk

NEW YORK ( TheStreet) -- Networking opportunities are great for any professional, but for small-business owners, the right connections can bring pathways to new suppliers, eager customers and corporate partnerships that can take a business to the next level.

If you've got only a couple of hours at a cocktail party to meet and greet, your first impulse may be to work the room quickly, giving as many elevator pitches as you can to well-heeled attendees. But coming off too aggressive or overly salesman-like can be a big turnoff. We checked in with networking experts who say that making a good impression with five or 10 people is far more important than throwing your business card at 30. Check out their top five tips for networking excellence.

How do you network effectively without sounding like a jerk?

Even though it may be cliche, Aurora Reinke, assistant professor at Kendall College's School of Business, says there's truth to the adage, "It's not about you."

"There is an ego element to being an entrepreneur," Reinke says. "You have to be a little in love with yourself to even take the risk in the first place."

Ultimately, what any entrepreneur wants to do is share the magic they bring to the table, she says, but part of that magic is being understanding of others and capable of listening and engaging in dialogue.

"Nobody likes a narcissist," she laughs.

With that said, there is a fine line between being full of oneself and not being vocal enough, says Mike Shook, managing partner of entrepreneurial executive firm Accelerence.

"You don't want to be overly promotional, but you must be enthusiastic while remembering the importance of humility," Shook says. "If you are not excited about what you are doing, how can anyone else be?"

"People you've interacted with should be left with the impression that you are very excited about what you are doing. They should know that your solution to a real problem is obvious and that you have the credentials and aptitude to transform an interesting idea into a good business," Shook says.

Networking with people you've just met is a subtle art, Jennefer Witter, owner and founder of PR firm The Boreland Group .

"Blatantly selling oneself can backfire," she says. "The most important thing to do is to listen to the person and gauge what he or she is doing or where specifically he or she wants or needs assistance. Yes, it is a good idea to trade business cards, but wait until the end of the conversation. And make sure you ask for that person's business card first, to demonstrate your interest in them."

What should you do when you're tempted to mention your business to everyone you meet?

"If you're temped to talk about it, that means you're passionate about it," says Chris Dessi, the CEO and founder of social media consultancy Silverback Social .