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Is Ackman Most Hated?; Facebook Immune to Google Monster: Cramer's Best Blogs

Tickers in this article: APD CP FB GOOG HLF JCP PC

NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- Jim Cramer fills his blog on RealMoney every day with his up-to-the-minute reactions to what's happening in the market and his legendary ahead-of-the-crowd ideas. This week he blogged on:

  • Bill Ackman and Herbalife; and
  • tech giants Google and Facebook.

Click here for information on RealMoney, where you can see all the blogs, including Jim Cramer's -- and reader comments -- in real time.


Don't Play Herbalife to Get at Ackman

Posted at 1:52 p.m. EDT on Wednesday, July 31

Let's face it. This whole Herbalife thing is a charade. Many of the people buying Herbalife don't know anything about Herbalife. Many don't care about the fundamentals or don't know about the point system and how Herbalife would prefer that you value the company on a point-per-share basis and not earnings per share, because Herbalife wants you to use the metric of sale points to grade the company. I bet most of the people buying Herbalife right now have never tried the product and never met anyone who has sold it.

They are doing it to break Bill Ackman, a guy who has to be the most hated guy in the Street since Gekko tendered for Teldar. They are trying to force Ackman to cover his Herbalife short or to get his brokers to buy him in through a short squeeze, and don't doubt this for a minute. It started with Carl Icahn and his legendary on-air spat with Scott Wapner on CNBC's "At the Half." But it has now escalated to a free-for-all against Ackman, betting that he can't bring his short in and that the Federal Trade Commission won't shut this stock down to get to Ackman's zero price target.

You know what's a shame? That somehow the football has become Herbalife, which actually reported a good EPS number, despite the "Ackman defense per share" line that Herbalife broke out. The revenue growth and cash flow growth were terrific. If somehow the company could get audited financials -- not the company's fault, all the fault of a bizarre insider trading deal by the auditor -- then I think it would be able to lever up and buy a ton of stock back, maybe even through a well-above-market Dutch tender.