5 Small U.S. Brewers Run by Foreign Companies

PORTLAND, Ore. (TheStreet) -- You can wrap your beer up in red, white and blue cans, you can call your lager "American-style" and tout your entire line of beers as "part of the American experience."

None of that makes a beer "American." Milwaukee's Miller Brewing was acquired by U.K.-via-South Africa's SAB in 2002, placing it firmly under foreign control. Denver-based Coors merged with Canada's Molson in 2005, splitting the brewery between the two countries. Though the term "American" still applies -- Canadians will remind U.S. drinkers that both are in North America -- it's tough to call MolsonCoors a U.S. company when one of its headquarters is in Montreal.

Just about anyone in St. Louis can attest that Budweiser is no longer an All-American beer, already a stretch for a beer whose name and formula have Czech origins and are routinely the subject of legal battles in Europe. Belgium's InBev bought A-B for $52 billion in 2008 and the resulting Anheuser-Busch InBev has headquarters in Leuven, Belgium, and Sao Paulo, Brazil.

If you're looking for the biggest of the U.S.-made brews, you'll have to turn to Pottsville, Pa. -- home of D.G. Yuengling & Son. Brewed in Pennsylvania and Tampa, Fla., Yuengling is the biggest beer produced solely in the U.S. -- churning out 2.79 million barrels last year. Boston-based Boston Beer comes in a close second with 2.727 barrels brewed in Boston, Pennsylvania and Ohio last year.

Unfortunately, that doesn't make regional or even craft beers a lock as U.S.-owned companies. A number of acquisitions in recent years have made a mess of the landscape and have placed even brewers with deep U.S. microbrewing roots into the hands of foreign owners. We took a look around and found the following five examples of U.S. brewers owned by overseas interests.