Apple: The Benefactor of Samsung's Fragmentation

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NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- On Tuesday CNET cited an IDC report that Apple is closing the gap on Samsung smart connected devices. This report takes into account a wide market section including; PCs, laptops, smartphones, and tablets. All the other Mac sites are reporting on it, but nobody is speculating why.

Well, let me offer up the following theory. Apple is the epitome of crafting simple product lines. There's iPod, iPad, iPhone and Mac. Each product is clearly defined with essentially similar choices within each line; small, medium and large. They all work the same, and they all have consistent look, feel, usability, operating systems, and compatibility. Buying an Apple product is a relatively simple purchasing experience, whether at an Apple retail store or online, it's about as uncomplicated as it gets.


Now, let's compare this with Samsung. We'll start with phones. Apple has the iPhone running iOS, which runs across all Apple mobile devices. Samsung has the Galaxy, the Galaxy Note and the Super Social with Windows Mobile. The Galaxy is a bit confusing, with the Galaxy III and the Galaxy Note - is it a phone or a tablet? Even Samsung asks this question on its Web site.

Then there's the Samsung Windows phones, which are split into two sub-models; the Odyssey and Focus - one is apparently good for business, the other for social networking.

Samsung tablets are just as confusing. There's the Galaxy Note, which isn't a phone, but comes in two sizes like the iPad. Then there's the Galaxy Tab, which is meant to control my media and entertainment systems. But wait, there's an app for that on my iPad - why do I need a $300 tablet just for that? It has this thing called Media Hub built in. If it's anything like my Samsung Smart TV media thingy, I don't want it - what a mess. And to round out the tablet offering, there's the Nexus 10 from Google . This appears to be the high-resolution entry into the tablet space. I've got to wonder, though, why did it take a Google-inspired tablet to go hi-res?