How to Double Your iPhone's Battery Life

Tickers in this article: AAPL
NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- I stopped and started several times before deciding to publish this article.

There's reason to have hesitated. One, I'm reluctant to write an article that reads like an ad for a product. Two, this isn't the type of article I typically write. Three, there's not much to say other than the answer to the question the title poses. And, four, I might be telling plenty of people something they already know.

But then I thought again ... if I didn't know about this, enough other folks likely exist who don't either, making it all worthwhile. Plus this is a big problem for a lot of people, if my Twitter feed serves as an any indication.

Battery life on Apple's iPhone. Namely iPhone 5. Depending on how you use your phone, it can leave a lot to be desired. Personally I have never had much of a problem, but enough people complain that one likely exists. From an investment perspective, some folks are bearish AAPL because they see Samsung and others passing Apple by.

Generally speaking, you can get other smartphones with superior battery life. Some models let you swap batteries. And so on.

I tend to discount these issues -- my long-term thesis notwithstanding -- as Apple remains present-day dominant. But, again, recurring beefs warrant attention.

I dealt with more of a "charge" issue last week when I was traveling in the Northeast. I left my iPhone charger at TheStreet's office on Wall Street when I left Wednesday evening. Staying in Midtown Manhattan, I didn't want to go back to fetch it or trek to the Apple Store (even though it was quite close to my hotel); as such I was left without a charger and, headed into my Thursday Amtrak trip from Penn Station to Washington, D.C., with a dying phone.

No big deal I figured. If I can't get a charge, I can live without the phone until I can bum a little white cord off of somebody. On the train, the gentleman seated next to me let me use his charger. That got me up to about 75%. But, by the time I arrived at my destination in DC, I was almost depleted.