iPhone 5S Teardown: What's Inside (Update 1)

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Update from 9:53 a.m. to include news on M7 chip and A7 fab in the sixth and eighth paragraphs.

NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- Web site iFixit took a look inside the newly launched Apple iPhone 5s. It found all the usual suspects, but did find one surprise.

Apple has included a Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) chip for the TouchID. The sensor technology uses the technology from AuthenTec, which Apple purchased over a year ago.

The camera chip, which makes the iSight camera run, is most likely from Sony , as the DNL markings are consistent with previous Sony housing, according to the Web site and Jim Morrison, vice president of the Technology Analysis Group at Chipworks.

Further tearing down the iPhone 5s, iFixit found a Murata 339S0205 Wi-Fi module, based off Broadcom's BCM4334. Broadcom also has its BCM5976 touchscreen controller inside the phone.

There's also the other usual players, including SK Hynix, providing the NAND Flash, Qualcomm , which is providing the PM8018 RF power management IC, MDM9615M LTE Modem, and WTR1605L LTE/HSPA+/CDMA2K/TDSCDMA/EDGE/GPS transceiver.

Longstanding Apple partner TriQuint Semiconductor has space in the iPhone 5s, supplying the TQM6M6224 chip. There also chipsets inside from Skyworks Solutions (77810, 77355), Avago Technologies (A790720, A7900) and Texas Instruments' 37C64G1 chip.

There are also several chipsets from Apple, including the much-talked-about 64-bit A7 chip, based on ARM Holdings ARMv8 instruction set. Apple 338S1216 and 338S120L are also included. Chipsworks found that Samsung continues to make the A7 chip for Apple, despite rumors that Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing was fabbing the chip for Apple.

iFixit could not find the M7 co-processor in its initial teardown that Apple talked up at the launch. iFixit believed the M7 could be built into the A7.

Update: Chipworks found that the M7 is indeed a separate chip, and is being made by NXP Semiconductor , the NXP LPC18A1.

--Written by Chris Ciaccia in New York

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