Sozzi: 3 Stats on the Crazy Weird U.S. Economy to Make You Stop and Think

Tickers in this article: BUD EBAY GOOG JWN KORS

NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- Admit it, you want to sound like the smartest person in the office. Whether in a formal meeting or backyard BBQ with co-workers, you are constantly trying to stick out from the pack in the hopes of securing that sweet promotion. I will give you a sample of how I would attack that pursuit of grandeur amongst my financial services crowd.

While they are dissecting the March non-farm payrolls report and its assorted stats that may or may not impact the musings of Fed Chairman Janet Yellen, I am out there looking for off-the-beaten path things that could shape FUTURE non-farm payrolls reports and corporate earnings releases.

Here are three items I have uncovered. Shout out to Google for making this possible.

  • First, Google queries related to "luxury goods" have fallen 10% in March while the Dow Jones Industrial Average and S&P 500 have basically been flat. That's particularly weird considering the new, spring styles staring the wealthy in the eyes at Nordstrom , Michael Kors , and Saks. Hmm.
  • Second, and this will get you thinking if businesses have taken on too much low interest rate-driven risk, Google queries related to "bankruptcy" have risen 12.73% in the past six months compared to a 6.98% Dow gain and a 9.8% S&P 500 increase. Bankruptcy queries had been underperforming both stock indices for the majority of the stock price recovery from March 2009.
  • Finally, and on the positive side, craft beer now accounts for 14.3% of the $100 billion that the U.S. spends on beer annually, after a 20% volume increase in 2013. Apparently, there is enough digital cash stored in eBay's PayPal mobile wallet to trade up from Anheuser-Busch InBev's  Budweiser.

You're welcome for all of this info. Brian Sozzi out.

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-- By Brian Sozzi CEO of Belus Capital Advisors, analyst to TheStreet.

This article represents the opinion of a contributor and not necessarily that of TheStreet or its editorial staff.