TheDeal: Dole's CEO Continues History of Dealmaking

Tickers in this article: DOLE
NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- Billionaire David H. Murdock apparently has a taste for pineapple. And for taking a company private when it is at its weakest and later returning it to the public markets.

That proclivity is evident in his latest move, an offer of $12 per share in cash for the roughly 60% of Dole Food he does not own.


The offer comes as the fruit and vegetable giant has reported declining earnings. Its net income was nearly $67 million in the hole for the quarter ended in March, according to a recent 10-Q filing, compared to a profit or positive net income for the same period a year ago of about $16 million.

Dole's Ebitda is also expected to take a hit. It generated $162 million in Ebitda for the fiscal year ended Dec. 29, but is estimated to generate just $139 million for this year, ending on Dec. 31, according to data provided by Bloomberg.

The company launched a strategic review in May 2012 and brought on board investment banks Deutsche Bank Securities Inc. and Wells Fargo Securities International Ltd. for guidance.

Murdock's history with Dole began in 1985 when he became chairman and chief executive after taking control of parent company Castle & Cooke Inc., according to reports, though details of that transaction are scant. Murdock secured Castle & Cooke when he merged it with his company Flexi-Van Corp. in 1985, according to Footnoted.com.

According to the Los Angeles Times, in 1990, publicly listed Castle & Cooke put Dole Food on the auction block, but failed to find a buyer.

In 1995 Castle & Cooke was spun off as a real estate company, while Dole remained focused on fruits and vegetables.

Murdock took Castle & Cooke private for about $600 million in 2000, according to The Deal Pipeline. At the time, he was chairman of both companies.


The price tag of the Castle & Cooke deal worked out to $18.50 per share. The company had been trading at a little over $12 per share before Murdock's bid was announced. In the five years after the split with Dole, Castle & Cooke shares never traded above $22.