Women Take Tech's Offer to Hit Work 'Restart' Button

SAN DIEGO (TheStreet) -- Stacey Sargent spent nearly two years trying to get her book to print through traditional methods.

She wrote a book proposal and searched for an agent and a publisher willing to take on the project.

When that approach didn't pay off, Sargent didn't give up.

"At a certain point I stopped and said, 'I feel so compelled about this message, I just want to write the book,'" says Sargent, CEO of Connect Growth and Development, a coaching company she founded in 2005. "So I researched how you self publish, went to some online forums and taught myself."

Two weeks ago, Sargent's first book -- Inner Critic Inner Success: Claiming Your Success While Taming Your Critic -- went live on Amazon . It will available on Kindle in a few weeks.

"Technology has moved publishing to a place that is more accessible to a wider group of people," Sargent says. "I would never have a book out there if I had gone the traditional route, through an agent and publisher. But I'm a women who is passionate about things, and technology allows me to match pace with the things I am passionate about and get my message out there right now."

Sargent is just one example of technology helping female entrepreneurs along the road to success, and self-publishing a book is just one way technology plays a role in Sargent's professional life.

In 2005, Sargent left a high-paying job as a project manager at Microsoft to start her company, which provides leadership and culture programs and coaching for clients such as Amazon, Raytheon , Expedia , Bungie, Moz and BigDoor. Sargent also does individual coaching for private clients. And often, she will do that coaching via Skype for clients all over the world.

"Because of technology, my business isn't limited to where I live anymore," Sargent says. "As an entrepreneur, I can reach anybody, anywhere."

Technology is helping women break down traditional barriers, find the appropriate audiences and customers for businesses, promote those businesses, publish books and even raise money to fund businesses through crowdsourcing.

While the same technology is available to all, business coach and strategy consultant Kate Purmal says that its leveling of the business playing field has benefited women to an extraordinary degree: Women are starting businesses 2-to-1 over men, she says.