Cramer: Looks Like We're Holding Our Own

Tickers in this article: KSU MWE UNP
Editor's Note: This article was originally published at 9:15 a.m. EDT on Real Money on May 24. To see Jim Cramer's latest commentary as it's published, sign up for a free trial of Real Money.

NEW YORK (Real Money) -- If you ask me, we could do worse than 2% to 2.5% growth. That's the level of activity that Union Pacific CEO Jack Koraleski thinks we can do in this country, and I believe that will result in a steady turn over time. Nothing rapid, but no slippage either. That pretty much jibes with the solid durable-goods numbers we just got Friday.

Why do I believe Koraleski has a bead on things? Because he's just about the biggest shipper of building materials, coal, oil, grain, chemicals and autos -- and that's pretty much everything that gives you a feel for what a nation can grow.

I was incredibly encouraged after speaking with Koraleski, because he is at the heart of the changing face of American industry due to the energy boom. Given the tight environmental noose on many pipeline developments, Union Pacific has stepped up by building new track everywhere and linking the wellhead to the refineries. That's a ton of jobs. I know from Frank Semple -- CEO of Markwest , a master limited partnership company -- that plenty of pipeline is still being laid, 18 projects worth multibillions just by Markwest alone. But the railcar imperative grows by the find -- and the runs from Texas (Eagle Ford) to Los Angeles, and from the Bakken to Louisiana, are really Union Pacific-dominated.

There's also a feverish building of chemical plants in the Southeast to take advantage of all of the natural gas and natural gas liquids being found, turning the materials into plastic and those oily materials. All are going Union Pacific's way.

Just the sheer volume of oil shipped is pretty amazing. Union Pacific moved more oil this quarter than it did all of 2011, and it is just beginning to ramp. If the Keystone pipeline doesn't get built, by the way, that oil will come via Union Pacific. If it does get built, this company will ship the pipe.

Autos isn't really an American story, unfortunately. The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has given Mexico such an edge that I expect far fewer jobs to be generated from autos than what would otherwise have occurred at this stage of the cycle. However, Union Pacific is the shipper that controls Mexico -- through partnerships with Kansas City Southern -- and that business is growing very quickly.