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Obama, Five Weeks After the Election, Hits the Campaign Trail

NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- When President Barack Obama spoke to a raucous group of workers in Redford, Mich., on Monday, he sounded as if he's still on the campaign trail despite his victory five weeks ago.

The trip to a Daimler Detroit Diesel plant was to pitch his plan for the so-called fiscal cliff -- when tax-relief measures and deep spending cuts will automatically go into effect.

"It is a great excuse for me to get out of Washington," Obama said. "I've said I will work with Republicans on a plan for economic growth, job creation and reducing our deficits, and have some compromise between Democrats and Republicans."

Shortly before his speech, Obama's dormant campaign apparatus reached out to its lengthy email list of supporters to use a so-called call tool. For those who sign up, the Obama campaign provides the user with a name and phone number to call, and asks them to read from a script that pitches the president's plan on tax cuts.

"We know we can affect change in Washington when we raise our voices together. So pick up the phone and make a few calls. Republicans in the House need to hear from their constituents," Stephanie Cutter, deputy campaign manager for Obama's campaign, said in the email.

Obama met with House Speaker John Boehner (R., Ohio) during the weekend, but aides refused to release any details of the discussion. The White House press secretary said Monday he thinks the best prospect for reaching an agreement was to keep private the details of conversations between the president and senior lawmakers.

The Michigan visit was one of many Obama has made to boost support for his budget plan. Obama said at the plant that he wanted to extend middle-class cuts, make necessary spending reductions and raise rates on the top 2% of income earners. The president said he isn't willing to compromise on the tax hike.

With the rally-like event at Daimler Detroit Diesel and the cold-call initiative, Obama turned to one of his greater strengths: campaigning.

-- Written by Joe Deaux in New York.

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