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Netflix Rules Internet-TV but Should Deliver More

Tickers in this article: CSTR NFLX TWX
NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- As a user, I love Netflix . My family watches it almost daily, and sometimes we have more than one TV playing Netflix.

What a change from when I grew up. Back in the '70s and '80s, we had only one TV, and the remote was either me or my brother, depending on who was closest to the tube at the time. Fighting for a place on the couch was more than just gaining a good vantage point; it was about who would have to get up to turn the dial.

I also remember standing in line for more than a half hour to check out a crappy movie that wasn't even on the list because the rest of the choice was picked over at the movie store on a holiday.

It's crazy how fabulous my kids have it, and just like I used to roll my eyes at listening how great I had it, my kids follow suit when I talk about walking to school in 6 feet of snow (I do live in Wisconsin, so they somewhat buy into the snow part).

With Netflix, my family now has 60 inches of on-demand entertainment, and if that screen is taken, we have two more that may not be as large, albeit they are at least double the size of what I mindlessly stared at when I was a kid.

It seriously can't be a surprise to see the popularity of Netflix grow, and it makes me scratch my head to read that my good friend (TheStreet's Rocco Pendola) and I have such a seemingly polar opposite view of the company. Take this article by Rocco as an example Netflix Original Programming Is Dead on Arrival. My take from Pendola is original programming is a mistake by Netflix. I loved watching House of Cards with Kevin Spacey.


Hemlock Grove I haven't watched (maybe that in itself is telling), but that doesn't spell the end of Netflix's ability to create original programming. Not every show on Time Warner's HBO was widely successful either. I enjoyed the HBO series Rome, but HBO canceled it due to financial considerations. More importantly, Netflix doesn't have to get it "right" every time, and a show can be widely successful even if it doesn't reach the HBO level.