Cramer: Some Warnings Would Be Nice

Editor's Note: This article was originally published at 7:02 a.m. EDT on Real Money on June 26. To see Jim Cramer's latest commentary as it's published, sign up for a free trial of Real Money.

NEW YORK (Real Money) -- Why can't someone in government just warn a guy? Why can't we see some leadership from someone just using the bully pulpit instead of insisting on legislation, or a quorum, or a level of opacity that does no one any good?

Right now the U.S. is gripped by a total lack of what I would call "authority." I'm talking about people in power using that power to get things done through suasion, and not just through meetings and votes and the straitjacket of regulations.

For example, take the Federal Reserve. It was kind enough to give us a head's-up about how it is going to let the yield curve revert to a more natural position. But Chairman Ben Bernanke, in one of his myriad speeches, could have simply said, "You know what? Those who are reaching for yield are going to get stung when we switch." How great would that have been? Just those simple words would have been a delicious shot across the bow that would have let managers know there's going to be a world of pain if they continue to do stupid things to get a little more juice to their returns.

Bernanke could have coupled that with a statement -- perhaps via go-to journalist Jon Hilsenrath of The Wall Street Journal -- to those using emerging-market money funds as a way to stretch yield. He could have simply told them that, when they switch, they will probably lose more than they would have realized -- perhaps intimating, "The door will be too small to places like Thailand or the Phillippines or anywhere else that's running an accounts deficit when we go less accommodative."

You put these managers on notice, and then the clients can act as a pressure point on them, reminding those managers that they don't want that kind of risk.

The Fed chief could have also issued a warning to those using ETFs in search of yield, letting them know they will be roughed up. While he was at it, he could have also said that bond funds might not be as safe as people think they are.