Cramer's 'Mad Money' Recap: The Bulls Are in Charge

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NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- Bear markets create problems but bull markets solve them, Jim Cramer told "Mad Money" viewers Wednesday. Cramer compared the prevailing wisdom of just four months ago against the realities of today.

Cramer said that back in December there were five things the bears were preaching: The federal government was about to fall off a cliff, the Federal Reserve was going to slow its bond buying and problems in Europe were back on the radar. If those didn't kill us, then surely the debt ceiling and sequester would and, if not, fourth-quarter earnings would certainly be miserable.

Cramer said all of these notions seemed perfectly plausible back then, but reality played out in a starkly different manner. Earnings turned out to be some of the best we've seen in 15 years.

Meanwhile, the markets simply stopped being worried about Washington or Europe. Our tax code didn't change all that much and the Fed won't be slowing its stimulus until employment picks up. The sequester has been a dud thus far and continued gridlock in Washington has been a boon for the markets.

It's time to embrace the future, Cramer concluded, as the markets focus on the future, not the past. The bulls are in charge and those remaining bears are just costing investors money.

A Pharma Dividend Play

All Big Pharma names are not created equal, Cramer told viewers, as he highlighted GlaxoSmithKline as the next stock in this week's focus on the sector. He said that Glaxo is not a breakup story, nor a catch-up stock, but a good, old-fashioned dividend play with a juicy 5.8% yield.

Cramer said that while a big yield is sometimes a red flag, that's not the case with Glaxo now that its legal issues are largely behind it. The company just reached a $3 billion settlement over the advertising of some of its anti-depressant drugs and it has a huge pipeline of new drugs.

Glaxo is set to seek approval for 15 drugs, some of them blockbusters, over the next three years. Everything from new asthma treatments to cancer drugs and heart therapies will be coming from the company in fairly short order. That translates into an 8.4% compound growth rate through 2018, said Cramer.