Jim Cramer's 'Mad Money' Recap: 2,000 Shows and Counting

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NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- Has the market lost its mind? That's what Jim Cramer asked his live audience outside the New York Stock Exchange as he celebrated the 2,000th episode of "Mad Money."

Cramer said that after fretting for weeks over the possibility of a government shutdown, the day that shutdown actually arrived the market did nothing but yawn. But that's how Wall Street works, Cramer explained -- it will now begin to be worried about the next big, bad event as the debt ceiling debate comes to a head Oct. 17.

Cramer reminded viewers that despite all of the attention paid to Washington, politics is only one piece in the stock puzzle. He warned against letting that one piece blind them to opportunities that still exist in the markets.

After all, that's what makes for better investors, seeing the real value of a stock as compared to its current value. What a stock is worth is rarely what you'll actually pay for it, he continued, which is what "Mad Money" has been all about since March 2005.

"There's always a bull market somewhere," Cramer reminded his audience, and he's happy to help find them night after night.

Executive Decision: Duncan Niederauer

In the "Executive Decision" segment, Cramer spoke with Duncan Niederauer, CEO of NYSE Euronext , about the markets, technology and the government shutdown.

Niederauer said every day is a struggle to both provide better, faster access to the markets while also keeping things running smoothly and retaining investor confidence. In retrospect, he said maybe the markets should've declared victory when the moved from fractions to decimals many years back, as everything that's occurred since then has only added complexity to the markets.

Niederauer said the markets need to be accessible to everyone, and scandals like the Facebook initial public offering and the "flash crash" only create missed opportunities to rebuild investor confidence.

When asked about the abundance of technology on the exchanges, Niederauer said that trading has always been a high-tech and high-touch business, and at the NYSE there will always be humans at the ready to take over if the technology runs into problems.