Jim Cramer's 'Mad Money' Recap: A Glass-Half-Full Market

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NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- It's time to look at this market as a glass half full, Jim Cramer said on "Mad Money" Monday. Cramer outlined a number of what he called silver linings in this quarter's earnings that the naysayers seem to be largely ignoring.

The current trend toward negativity is nothing new, Cramer said. He recounted the months that followed the market crash in 1987. Back then, he noted, every rally was met with skepticism and today's market is no different. But just as it was wrong to give up and go home in 1988, it would be equally foolish to give up today.

The markets still operate on the law of supply and demand, Cramer reminded viewers, which is why now that many of the sellers are drying up, even the laggards are seeing their stocks rally. That's certainly the case with Caterpillar , said Cramer, as that company's stock barely flinched after yet another disappointing quarter. The same pattern was seen in McDonald's , Merck and Microsoft , three stocks that are all trending higher even after lackluster earnings.

The naysayers in Walt Disney have been shaken out, as have most of those betting against Wal-Mart and others, noted Cramer. That's why investors should pay attention to these silver linings, but they simply don't happen in a bear market.

Executive Decision: Irwin Simon

In the "Executive Decision" segment, Cramer sat down with Irwin Simon, chairman, president and CEO of Hain Celestial , the healthy and organic food company whose shares are up 48% in 2013.

Simon said Hain will be providing nearly 1.5 million organic turkeys this Thanksgiving, a sign consumers are on top of what they're eating and want a great-tasting bird while showing concern for both animal welfare and the environment.

Simon also responded to recent criticisms about his company's cash flow, saying Hain has been able to grow organically in the high single digits and that's far better than any other food company. He said despite that high growth, Hain is still able to make money and pay down its debt at the same time. Hain was built on great acquisitions, Simon continued, and he has no plans to change that direction.