Jim Cramer's 'Mad Money' Recap: A Winning Market

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NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- When good things happen that aren't suppose to happen, that's when you get a winning stock market, Jim Cramer said on "Mad Money" Wednesday. Cramer said there have been a host of negatives that were supposed to be keeping stocks lower but many of them have simply failed to materialize.

The financials have been heading lower quarter after quarter, Cramer noted, but today Bank of America delivered a true upside surprise, a move which has that stock already up 10% for the year.

Intel was supposed to be in horrible shape with the PC market declining. Yet, many of the component makers, like Seagate , has all been rallying.

Even maligned businesses like construction equipment and oil tankers have been bucking the negative trends, with Caterpillar seeing strong sales and low inventory in the U.S., while Nordic American Tanker is seeing day rates for its ships soar.

Even cable TV, which is supposed to be suffering from cord cutters, is seeing stocks such as Comcast hit 52-week highs as the bidding war heats up for Time Warner Cable .

This is what happens when the bad news isn't that bad, Cramer concluded. There's likely more positive news yet to come.

Executive Decision: Barry Davis

For his "Executive Decision" segment, Cramer sat down with Barry Davis, president and CEO of Crosstex Energy , an oil and gas master limited partnership that's up 80% since Cramer last checked in with the company a year ago.

Davis said these are exciting time for Crosstex and a new era for the industry as the oil and gas revolution in America continues. He said his company's new partnership with Devon Energy will help provide a diverse portfolio of assets that's over 95% fee-based, meaning they're not tied to the price of the commodities they move.