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Jim Cramer's Best Blogs

Tickers in this article: AAPL NFLX

NEW YORK ( TheStreet) -- Jim Cramer fills his blog on RealMoney every day with his up-to-the-minute reactions to what's happening in the market and his legendary ahead-of-the-crowd ideas. This week he discussed:

  • Apple's arrogance; and
  • why Netflix is soaring.

Click here for information on RealMoney, where you can see all the blogs, including Jim Cramer's -- and reader comments -- in real time.


Everybody Wants Some

Posted at 10:55 a.m. EST on Friday, Jan. 25

Overshooting is something, isn't it? There are times when, if you take your cue from a stock's action, it will drive you crazy. Apple (AAPL) is one of those stocks right now.

Put simply, if you want growth -- consistent growth that makes you feel the name will do even better in the out years than it is doing now -- you have to buy Apple right here.

But if you see a flattening of growth or, heaven forbid, an actual contraction, then you have to sell it right here.

At this moment, the bearish view has more adherents than the bullish one does, so the stock is being sold. In the meantime, bewildered people who bought it because it was rising, of course, are taking their cue from the fact that it is now going lower.

Both groups of sellers, meanwhile, are heavily motivated either by what they perceive to be their charter or by fear itself.

What do the buyers have? How about discipline? Anyone who is a value-stock buyer knows the drill of growth going to value. There is no hurry, because there will be no quick reversal unless the company does something big and bold. While Apple is certainly a big and bold product creator, it is not a big and bold stock-market manager. I bet there isn't a soul on the top level of Apple who thinks this stock-market move is right. I bet few even fathom it.

Last night, on Twitter, there was a post @jimcramer claiming I was wrong Thursday when I said the conference call drove it lower.

It was a stupid, uninformed comment. First, that isn't what I said. I just said it was a bad conference call , because you could see the stock drop, yet it didn't matter to Apple's participants on the call.

Second, that lack of acknowledgement thus failed to break the free fall in the company's stock. If you think your sole job is to build the best products available, then you shouldn't care about the stock -- as long as you build the best products available . Much of the selling is coming from people who believe other companies are now building equally good products that they're selling more cheaply vs. Apple.