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Cramer's 'Mad Money' Recap: Next Week's Game Plan

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NEW YORK ( TheStreet) -- The markets are headed into the second quarter with a full head of steam, Jim Cramer said Thursday on "Mad Money." But that doesn't mean the skeptics won't be out in full force on Monday with a while new set of reasons to worry.

Whether it's fears about the sequester, China or the next European country with banking woes, Cramer said the naysayers will have a lot to talk about during the second quarter. But that doesn't mean the market's fundamentals aren't just as good as they've been all year.

That's why on Monday, Cramer said he'll be watching the Chinese PMI numbers, along with our own ISM numbers, so he can use any market weakness to do some buying.

Cramer said on Tuesday he'll be watching spice maker McCormick , a company he expects to report great numbers. Meanwhile, on Wednesday he'll be watching ConAgra , which he recommended buying on any weakness, along with Monsanto , a stock he suggested taking some profits in ahead of its results.

Thursday brings news from the European Central Bank, and Cramer said he's not expecting anything good to come from that announcement. Finally, on Friday Cramer will be watching the non-farm payroll numbers because hey may be the last "good" numbers before the sequester takes hold.

Executive Decision: Martin Mucci

In the "Executive Decision" segment, Cramer spoke with Martin Mucci, president and CEO of Paychex , the payroll processor with a 3.7% yield and shares that are hitting 52-week highs.

Mucci said the U.S. economy continues to grow, but at a very slow rate. He said Paychex has seen an increase in the number of checks per payroll at existing companies for 12 consecutive quarters, but is not yet seeing a large pickup in the number of new businesses being formed.

When asked what it would take to jump-start new businesses, Mucci said that as the housing market improves, new business will begin to form around it and expand from there. Overall, however, he said many businesses still have concerns over healthcare costs and may be reluctant to begin hiring.