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Cramer's 'Mad Money' Recap: Stock Market Survival School

Tickers in this article: FB SKF
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A version of this program last aired July 1, 2010.

NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- Every time you think you've seen it all, Wall Street comes up with the new twist to make you think that investing is just not worth the trouble, Jim Cramer told his "Mad Money" TV show viewers as he dedicated the entire show to helping home gamers avoid the most common investing pitfalls. Cramer said that scandals are not new to Wall Street, but that doesn't mean that investors can't protect themselves.

The unfairness of the markets has been racketed up of late, Cramer told viewers. As if the self-induced great recession wasn't bad enough, Wall Street came up with the flash crash of 2010, and more recently, the hideous Facebook IPO in 2012, as two more examples of why investors should take just their money and go home.

Cramer said Facebook could have been a wonderful opportunity to lure investors back into stocks, but instead, greed took over, sending the IPO into total chaos and overvaluation. The "flash crash" was also an embarrassing black eye for the markets, he said, as it proved to the world that no one on Wall Street, and especially the regulators, has any idea what's actually happening.

Then there are the scandals involving fund mangers gone wild, cases like Raj Rajaratnum and Bernie Madoff, which all but prove that the game is rigged against the little guy.

Cramer said scandal can't be stopped and there will always be down markets, but by following just a few simple rules, investors can have a fighting chance.

His first rule: Know what you own. He said by knowing what you own and why you own it, investors can see events like the flash crash as an opportunity to buy more, and they certainly won't be duped into buying an overhyped IPO like Facebook or the unrealistic returns offered by Rajaratnum and Madoff.

Questions like, "How does this company do?" and "How do they make money?" go a long way, said Cramer. How can you ever know to cut your losses if you don't know why you bought it in the first place?

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