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Everything Lance Armstrong Has Done Means Nothing Now

Tickers in this article: RSH NKE
NEW YORK ( TheStreet) -- When doctors diagnosed my mother-in-law with advanced lung cancer, one of the first things I did was send her Lance Armstrong's book, It's Not About the Bike: My Journey Back to Life .

When she died in February, I was convinced that inspiration she culled from Armstrong helped her live past the upper-end of the two-to-24 months window her oncologist gave her at the outset. And, save the disgusting and pathetic end, she lived relatively well for just over two years, despite the treatments, various setbacks and the fate she never talked about, but knew she would ultimately face.

At daybreak Wednesday, I woke up to what appeared to be more orchestration from the Lance Armstrong camp. Every time I see Lance in the news, I think about my mother-in-law.

It came down all too perfect on Twitter.

One Tweet alerts the masses to news that Lance Armstrong stepped down from his chairman position on Livestrong's board. At almost the same time, Nike (NKE) announced its decision to sever ties with Armstrong. Shortly thereafter, Radio Shack (RSH) made it clear that it has no active agreements with Lance.

Of course, this is conjecture, but there's little question in my mind that Lance, Livestrong, Nike and Radio Shack worked together on the timing of all of this. Something about that just bugs the hell out of me.

For more than a decade, Lance's life appears to have been little more than smoke and mirrors. He makes corporate America and Wall Street look like clean, straightforward and transparent operations.

That said, I never had much problem with the doping. Anybody who follows cycling knew the score.

The government went on a witch hunt, handing out immunity like the Fed prints dollar bills. None of the regulatory, cycling or anti-doping organizations involved care one way or the other about cleaning up the sport or prosecuting the guilty; everybody just wanted to get their man. And they did.

Through it all, Armstrong never made a move that wasn't calculated. Little appears to be real about the guy from my admittedly uninformed perch. But, based on appearance and virtually every second-hand account, I think it's safe to assume that Lance Armstrong tends to be warm and friendly in front of the camera, when he's relaying the script that is his life; otherwise he's little more than a cardboard cutout.

When it became obvious that the USADA nailed him to the wall, Armstrong never owned up. All we received were prepared statements and lame Tweets. Contrast that with this must-watch interview, via the CBC, with Canadian cyclist Michael Barry.

You've got to give a "dirty" guy credit for finally coming clean. That was sincere; something we rarely get from Armstrong. Right till the end.