Jay Z, Apple TV: Tim Cook Needs to Get His Head Out of His ...

Tickers in this article: AAPL
NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- In last week's Will Apple Ever Release a New Product I buried the lead.

The question -- What the hell happened to Apple TV? -- must come to the forefront. It's shocking that few people press Cook on the issue. Steve Jobs had things figured out, yet the living room remains an area of interest, according to Cook.

Innovation at Apple these days equals the SVP of Worldwide Marketing cursing in a room of Kool-Aid drinkers about a product that hasn't even been released yet and, relatively speaking, nobody will buy.

Then, there's this ...

Not necessarily a game changer? Not at all. Not for Samsung. Not for Apple. It's one of those things we must consider in the big picture for both companies going forward.

My friend on Twitter, Nick Cicero called it "lifestyle marketing."

Here's the deal.

Tim Cook is not Steve Jobs. Nobody is. So, yes, without a doubt, Apple must change. It has to. Because it can't be the same way it was under Jobs. That's just not possible.

But change is not dividends and buybacks, an iPhone trade-in program, different size iPhones, multi-color iPhones and the false bravado we saw at the Worldwide Developers Conference. Apple must honestly consider what it lost when Steve Jobs went away and change in these areas.

While it can still advertise on the back cover of magazines -- as it always has, with or without Jobs-- it can no longer get on the front cover. At least not the way it once did. Fortune's Adam Lashinsky wrote about this in his book, Inside Apple. Jobs took care of getting Apple the priceless and free advertising appearances on the front cover bring. Practically anybody can buy space on the back of the magazine; getting on the front cover consistently takes something special.

As such, in the absence of this, Apple needs to think different. How do we create the spectacle like Jobs used to, but in our own way? That's what Jobs meant when he (reportedly) said, Don't ask what I would do, just do what's right. He didn't mean, throw everything I built the company on out the window and do it your way.