Cramer's 'Mad Money' Recap: Good Earnings, Bad Market

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NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- The market is allowed to go down, Jim Cramer told "Mad Money" viewers Wednesday. Sometimes, it even goes down for no good reason. That was the case in today's trading, he said, as many great companies saw their stocks fall despite reporting great earnings.

Cramer said there are still plenty of bears and naysayers abound spouting off a litany of totally credible reasons why the markets should be lower. Whether it's a weak economy, Federal Reserve policy, troubles in Europe, a slowing China, rising taxes or stocks that have simply run too much and are now too expensive, the bears always have a great argument. The only problem is, they've been wrong for the last 4,000 points.

The bears always seem smart, Cramer added, and they never seem to be proven wrong -- but that doesn't mean that investors should shy away from stocks. Cramer never advocates buying the markets as a whole, but rather picking only the very best stocks while steering clear from the very worst.

Stocks like Domino's Pizza and Eaton have both recently appeared on "Mad Money" and had good stories to tell, said Cramer. Those stories haven't changed just because the investors decided to take some profits. In fact, just like merchandise at the mall goes on sale, stocks do as well, which is why today should be viewed as a buying opportunity and not as a reason to panic.

Cramer said he would certainly join the bears if there were indeed a change in Fed policy or major news out of Europe, but neither of those things happened today. And that's why stocks today are more valuable than they were yesterday.

Executive Decision: Rick Hamada

In the "Executive Decision" segment, Cramer once again sat down with Rick Hamada, CEO of Avnet , the tech component supplier that delivered a three-cents-a-share earnings beat on better-than-expected revenue.

Hamada said that in the tech world no company can afford to stand still, which is why Avnet now considers uncertainty the new normal and is planning its business around that new standard. He said that his company is in the supply chain solutions business and is working closer with customers than they ever have before.